Category: For Educators

Joining A Club: What’s In It For Me?

Becoming more social and developing self-confidence has taken time for me. Back when I was in middle and high school, I was shy, quiet and reserved. Joining a sports team and a social awareness club in high school was out of my comfort zone but ultimately helped me to interact with other students I might […]

Seasonal Affective Disorder

September often marks a big transition–the end of summer, the start of a new school year and shorter daylight hours. While some people look forward to all things pumpkin spiced and sweatshirt weather returning, others approach this change with genuine concern. Unfortunately, this year, coupled with the continued social distancing, we anticipate it being difficult […]

Preparing You for a Challenging Year

As we embark on a new school year it seems that everything is important. Parents, educators and teens are concerned about health, academic development, friendships and socialization, sports, extracurriculars and everything in between. This is complicated by the disparate nature of education for students: in-person, remote, hybrid and the other creative options being utilized to keep children, teens and communities physically safe and healthy.

Second Step and Erika’s Lighthouse – 2020-21 School Year Implementation

With the start of the 2020-21 school year, social emotional learning (SEL) and the topic of mental health are more important than ever for both students and educators. While Erika’s Lighthouse primarily offers classroom-based programs focusing on depression education, we have adapted to the needs of our school partners this year, have widened our net […]

Creative Classes Count

“No singing…” “No movement…” “No choir…” “No wind instruments…”(OK full disclosure, this gets rid of the recorder which is not an entirely bad thing if I’m honest… but I digress.) Music is the international language. We really have two viruses right now that we are battling: COVID-19 and racism. Music unites people from all different […]

Resource Highlight: Intervention Language For Educators

What does it mean to be a “Trusted Adult?” According to our Shared Vocabulary, a trusted adult is a person whom teens feel comfortable or safe to turn to when they have a problem, need help, have embarrassing or difficult questions, and just need/want to talk to someone. Being a trusted adult and having difficult […]